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Throwback Thursday: Ricky Watters Day

Put on your thinking cap for a moment.

Can you name a memorable moment from the 49ers/Giants rivalry pre-1981?

Quick.

Give me one thing.

One…one…one…one…one.

Ok, I think we’ve found our answer.

None.

The Giants and 49ers rekindled their rivalry last year in a pair fun games including the NFC title game last January.

Or as I like to call it “The Eli Manning Got The Tar Kicked Out Of Him But Managed To Someone Win Anyway Game.”

With both teams among the NFL’s elite again and meeting this Sunday in San Francisco, it’s a flashback to the 80s when both were cranking out Super Bowl appearances.

Beginning with the ’81 playoffs, the 49ers and Giants met eight times in the postseason with each team winning four times.

However, the spotlight shined brightest while Ronald Reagan and George Bush ruled America.

Their decade-long struggle in the 80s culminated in the 1990 NFC title game when the Giants ended San Francisco’s three-peat quest.

That historic game marked the beginning of the rivalry as we knew it.

Joe Montana, Roger Craig, Ronnie Lott, Bill Parcells, and Bill Belichick would all leave their respective teams soon after; thus, bringing a thaw to one of the league’s hottest rivalries.

Before their championship teams completely disintegrated, the pair met in the 1993 NFC Divisional round.

When the Giants arrived to Candlestick Park, their collective gas tank appeared to be on empty.

An emotionally grueling season-finale overtime loss to the Cowboys stripped New York of the NFC East title, home-field advantage, and perhaps in the long run, a chance to reach Super Bowl XXVIII.

The Giants mustered enough energy to slip by Minnesota at home 17-10 in the wild card round one week later.

Yet, New York’s remains ran into a San Francisco buzzsaw in the divisional playoffs days later.

San Francisco’s 44-3 win was punctuated by five rushing touchdowns from Pro Bowl running back Ricky Watters.

The 49ers went on to lose the NFC title to Dallas one week later.

Despite its anonymity in NFL history, it’s a notable game in Giants history.

Neither Phil Simms or Lawrence Taylor played for Big Blue again.

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